menu
Close
RHAME   •   BOWMAN   •   SCRANTON   •   GASCOYNE
RHAME   •   BOWMAN   •   SCRANTON   •   GASCOYNE
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
YouTube
scroll down

News

North Dakota Tourism
CONTACT


Bowman County Courthouse
104 1st St NW
Bowman, ND 58623

Happy hunting: Scranton in Top 5 for pheasants

October 09, 2015

By BRYCE MARTIN

 

Pioneer Editor | bmartin@countrymedia.net

Bowman County was recently named one of the Top 5 locations in North Dakota for pheasant hunting, according to the North Dakota Bureau of Tourism.

Specifically, the best area in the county to nab those pesky yet sought-after birds is in .

According to a recent report by the North Dakota Department, pheasant counts in the region saw a 34 percent increase in 2014, which was about 30 percent more than 2013.

The Scranton area is vastly populated with the ring-neck variety of both males, with the more colorful feathers, and females, typically light brown in color, often seen gathering along the highway and rural roads surrounding the city. While they occasionally present a hazard for highway drivers as they try to dodge the birds, the large amount means a good hunting trip for others.

Throughout the state, the numbers of pheasants has been on the rise for the last two hunting seasons.

Statistics by the game and fish department indicated more than 78,000 hunters—up 2 percent—bagged 587,000 pheasants—up 31 percent.

Two years ago, those numbers stood at 76,000 and 447,000, respectively.

“The last two years of fairly mild winters and good weather during nesting season has bumped up recruitment and the number of birds in the fall has noticeably improved,” said Stan Kohn, Game and Fish upland game management supervisor. “That could mean a better harvest this fall over last year as well.”

But those harvesting most of the pheasants in the Bowman County region were nonresidents, totalling about 11 percent. Hettinger was at the top of that list, with 25.7 of its hunters coming from another city or state.

The statistics presented by the department were determined by a mail-in survey of resident and nonresident hunters.

Back