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101 1st St NE
Box 12
Bowman, ND 58623-0012

City mulls major rehab project for Main Street

September 23, 2016

 

A LOOK AT BOWMAN'S CITY PROJECTS � The city of Bowman was filled with construction activity over the summer, with multiple projects being completed using the city�s one-time surge funding, a total of $6.7 million from the state�s oil and gas taxes. These projects represent projects made possible without a single dollar coming from taxpayers as a result of the surge funding. The funds, detailed here using approximate dollar amounts, have all been earmarked. Here is a brief overview of what the city did. (By Bryce Martin/Pioneer Editor)
A LOOK AT BOWMAN’S CITY PROJECTS — The city of Bowman was filled with construction activity over the summer, with multiple projects being completed using the city’s one-time surge funding, a total of $6.7 million from the state’s oil and gas taxes. These projects represent projects made possible without a single dollar coming from taxpayers as a result of the surge funding. The funds, detailed here using approximate dollar amounts, have all been earmarked. Here is a brief overview of what the city did. (By Bryce Martin/Pioneer Editor) 

By BRYCE MARTIN
Pioneer Editor | bmartin@countrymedia.net

A sizable chunk of funds have become available with the city of Bowman’s surge fund projects collectively coming in under budget. With those remaining funds, totaling more than $800,000, city commissioners have added another project to its docket, one that focuses on Main Street.

The plan, according to Bowman City Commission President Lyn James, is for the rehabilitation of water mains that run along the center of Main Street, from Northwest Tire to south of Windy’s Bar and Pizza, and from Northwest Tire to the Bowman Fire Department.

With the majority of Bowman’s commerce located in the designated area, tearing up of streets and closing sections of road would be difficult.

But it’s a worst-case scenario for the city.

The best-case scenario, as James explained, is the ability for a company to complete the project that offers a new technology when replacing water mains that would not disrupt pavement.

James said the city is currently waiting for that company to visit the planned project site and determine whether it is a candidate for the special procedure.

The city would still have to replace the aprons, the concrete pad where vehicles park along the curb, since there are current structural issues with them. That would disrupt the pavement, but in a limited amount. Crews could also possibly need to disrupt the curb stops, where city water service is accessed, along the stretch.

“It would be the least invasive,” James said.

If the city is not a candidate for that procedure, the project would still continue as planned, slated for next summer, but wouldn’t be as convenient for people and businesses downtown since the pavement would need to be removed to access water lines.

The project is crucial to prevent future problems with the aging lines, according to James, which are some of the first laid down in the city.

“We’re being proactive,” James explained.

 

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